Sunday, June 2, 2019

Change of Plan for Clare


This month's photo is from 2005.  Some of you will remember that I (Clare) first came to Papua New Guinea (PNG) to teach grade two children at Ukarumpa International School.  This is the school that Levi, Heidi and Eowyn now attend, alongside children of other Bible Translation workers.  
Over the last 13 years, I've served at the school in a variety of different areas.  Between mid-June and January I'll be taking on the role of temporary (and part-time) principal.  I'm excited about this opportunity; I can already see that all I've learnt in my years of missionary care and parenting will be useful in this role. But I am aware that it will also be very challenging!

Over the next two weeks I'll be handing over my work in the staff care department as well as ending my year of teaching mathematics to students with special educational needs.  I'll be asking many questions of the current principal too and starting to move into the new role.   That's an awful lot of juggling!   And I'm also recovering from a virus that I caught while working at the school.  I am very grateful for your prayers and for a God who I can fully rely on.

Thank you so much for your love and support towards us all; we certainly couldn't be doing this alone.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

New Workers, Many Languages

At the beginning of the year, 32 new Wycliffe members attended a training course here at the Ukarumpa centre to prepare them for life and work in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

Andrew and I enjoyed being part of a 'support worker panel' where the students on the course asked questions to those of us who have been supporting Bible Translation here.

I'm currently meeting with each of these new workers on behalf of the Staff Care department.  I'm enjoying getting to know them and hearing about their experiences during these first few months in the country.
The United Nations has declared 2019 to be the 'International Year of Indigenous Languages'.

At our organisation's recent biennial conference, we felt inspired after hearing from our International Executive Director, Dr. Michel Kenmonge, who shared his experience of growing up with a Cameroonian indigenous language as his mother tongue.  Watch this video to hear some of his story and to join us in celebrating the world's 7097 languages:



It is wonderful to see how God continues to provide for all our needs.  We are deeply grateful for a church that has been a partner in our work since I first came to PNG, and sent their final gift to Wycliffe earlier this year.  In the same month, a different church gave us the opportunity to share about our work; we are excited that this has led to a new partnership.  We are so thankful for this provision.

Monday, October 8, 2018

The Local Valley

We are blessed to have this view from the back of our house:

The village in the photo is one of several that are within walking distance of the Ukarumpa centre.  These villages are home to many of our Papua New Guinean colleagues and friends.

 This statement was put out by our organisation here in PNG:

'There has been fighting between two villages in Aiyura valley where our headquarters is located, but approximately 2 kilometres away.   Proactive security measures have been taken to closely monitor traffic through our centre and minimize the number of staff travelling through the valley.  The Royal PNG Constabulary (police) have sent a team of officers to restore law and order, and attempt to enable a peace agreement.

Several of our staff's friends or paid staff's loved ones have been impacted by this fighting – and we are concerned for their well-being.
Although the unrest is not targeted at our organisation, please join us in prayer that God would bring about peace for His glory.'

Thank you for praying with us.

For some encouraging news, read about a literacy course attended by many from local villages.  Participants found they were able to read their Bibles for the first time ever after attending the course.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Coffee!

Did you sample any of the Kamano Kafe coffee that we took with us on our travels last year? 

I
(Clare) recently accompanied a class trip to the hut where the Kamano Kafe Bible Translation Team produces it:


First, a hand crank hulling machine is used to remove parchment
(a thin, paper-like membrane) from the dry beans.  Next, five kilograms of coffee beans are put into the roasting machine (see picture below), where they are constantly rotated to prevent burning.  A window in the machine means that the operator can see when the desired roast has been reached. 



Finally, the coffee is poured into bags and sold.  The profits are used to fund the continued work of Bible translation into the Kamano Kafe language